Live-coding in lecture

One of the many teaching methodologies we employ at Hackbright came up in some reading I was doing today. Something we experiment with is the Worked Examples style of lecture. Essentially, this has us do live-coding in class, as we work through example problems using some of the tools that will be demonstrated in the exercise. Although students report back that they find live code to be more difficult to follow, and the lectures more confusing in general, during the exercise I've noticed fewer questions that require me to go over material that was covered in lecture, and more clarifying questions. Furthermore, as students have more clarifying questions, they're more apt to experiment with the interpreter rather than ask the questions of instructors.

I believe this is because the way information is presented leads us to retain it, or discard it. When someone is learning new information, the amount of "effort" put forth during the absorption of knowledge is proportional to how much of it is retained. When individuals display a high proficiency in typing, but a low proficiency in writing, they also usually report that they "remember more" when taking hand-written notes. I think this is due to the degree of struggle, or "effort", being proportionate to the reward.